Tips and Drills


Perfects - Shooting Drill

Overview:

This is a great drill for players to practice shooting with perfect form and also a for coaches to teach and correct shooting form.

Setup:

Players form three lines a couple of feet out from the basket. Use both ends of the court if possible so that kids get to take more shots. Every players has a basketball.

How it Works: 

Players then take it in turns shooting with the aim to swish each shot through the net. The swish is important because we're trying to teach the kids how to shoot with enough arc on the shot.

After a player has taken a shot, they can either return to the end of the same line or rotate lines either clockwise or anticlockwise.

Coaching Points:

·          Players must hold their shooting form until the shot has been made or missed.

·          Coaches must view each players' shot at different angles. Different angles will show different technique points.

·          You can extend the distance of the shot, but make sure it's not too far. The purpose of this drill is shooting with perfect form around the basket.

  

21 Cones - Shooting Drill

Overview:

'21 cones' is a variation of the drill '23 cones' which is a drill I recommend for high school level and higher.

All players are in two teams and each time a player hits a shot, they're awarded a cone for their team.

Setup:

Place 21 cones on the baseline of one end of the court and then split your players up into two teams. Each team has only one basketball.

How it Works:

The two teams of players shoot from the designated spot. When a shot is made, the shooter is rewarded by being allowed to sprint to the other end of the court and retrieve a cone for their team.

The team that finishes with the most cones is the winner.

Coaching Points:

·          Everyone must be shooting. Not just the best shooters on each team.

·          If you don't have cones, you could use tennis balls or anything else similar.

·          You can decrease or increase the amount of cones.

 

Pivot Shooting - Shooting Drill

Overview:

This is a great drill for incorporating footwork into a shooting drill that players will enjoy.

Players perform a jump stop on receiving the pass from the coach, pivot around to square up to the basket, and then make a variety of scoring moves.

Setup:

  Players all start on the baseline in two lines. There are two coaches/parents at the top of the key. One in front of each line.

Every player has a basketball.

How it Works:

Players will begin the drill by making a chest pass out to the coach in front of them. Immediately after making the chest pass, the player will explode to the free-throw line where the coach will pass the ball back to them.

After catching the basketball in a jump stop, the player must must pivot around using good technique and square up to the basket before shooting or attacking the ring.

The coach decides which scoring move they want the players to make.

Coaching Points:

·          Make sure every player is jump stopping correctly. You might need to run through this with the players before running the drill.

·          Players should not raise up out of their low stance when pivoting.

·          Change up whether your team attacks the rim or takes a jump stop. Keep it interesting.

   Chase Down Layups - Shooting Drill

: Chase down layups is used to teach players to finish layups at full speed and with pressure. Since youth basketball is normally decided by which team makes more layups, this is a drill you must use often.

Setup:

The drill begins with two lines of players down each end of the floor. One offensive line and one defensive line.

One basketball starts at the front of the offensive line at each end of the court.

How it Works:

The coach starts the drill by bringing the offensive player out from the baseline and gives them an advantage over the defender who always starts on the baseline. It's up to the coach's discretion how far in front the offensive player is.

We want the offensive player far enough in front that they have to sprint while dribbling down the floor and then when they finish at the rim there's close defensive pressure behind them.

When they're both set up, the coach calls out 'GO' and both players sprint to the other end of the floor. The offensive player must try and finish at the rim and the defender must pressure the shot without fouling.

The pair then passes the basketball to the next player in line at their current end of the floor.

 

"It Starts In the PARKS"